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Monthly Archives: June 2010

Colon Hydrotherapy Coffee Enema Update

Since my last post, I did some research on coffee enema’s. Here is what I learned:

The effects of a coffee enema are different than a saline enema. The most important difference between a saline enema and a coffee enema is the presence of caffeine in the coffee. Caffeine, theophylline and theobromine, combine to stimulate the relaxation of smooth muscles causing dilatation of blood vessels and bile ducts. The effects of having a coffee enema are not the same as drinking coffee. The veins of the anus are very close to the surface of the tissue. The caffeine is therefore absorbed more quickly (and in higher concentration) than it is in when you drink it.

I took the liberty of trying it out for myself and I loved the results.

Coffee Enema Recipe

Bring 8 cups of water to a boil.
Grind eight heaping spoonfuls of organic coffee. Put it in a french press pot. You can use a drip coffee maker, but be sure to use organic, non-bleached coffee filters.
Pour the water over the coffee grounds and let it steep then cool for one hour or more.
After this amount of time, the liquid should be about body temperature. If you stick your finger in the water it should be lukewarm or cool, but not hot.
Press the coffee grounds to the bottom, then pour the coffee liquid into the enema bag.

 

Dextoxing with Raw Foods and Colon Hydrotherapy

Once you’ve spent any amount of time diving into improving your health, eventually you’ll realize that no matter what you put into your body, it all needs to come out as well.

A really good cleanse does a body good. I always do an annual cleanse almost like a spring cleaning but for my body. I love the way I feel so light after a cleanse. Last year I did several cleanses over a period of months that worked for certain parts of my body. I began with a liver cleanse that lasted for 2 weeks, then moved on to a heavy metal cleanse, kidney, gallbladder, lymph and colon. My thought on the order of the cleanse made sense to me at the time, but I began with the liver and ended with it as well since I knew I would be flushing it with more toxins as the cleanse continued for other parts of the body. I thought maybe if I did the liver first, it would be able to process out the series of toxins to follow easier.

I’m about to begin a new cleanse and this time, I am considering a good whole body cleanse, but my main intention is to cleanse and build my digestion in a way that will benefit me for a longer period of time. Naturally Raw Foods assists in cleansing the body from toxins. It’s high fiber content and enzymes act as a broom to sweep away toxins. I feel the need to help it further along, so I will also be going to see a Certified Colon Hydrotherapist. I had a great once back in Valencia, CA but since I’m in Oregon now, I’ll have to do some homework on the local hydrotherapists and get a good referral ahead of time. DO NOT go to a therapist who isn’t certified in some manner for this process. If you haven’t been before, it can be a little intimidating and it’s nice to have someone with a good bedside manner who has the experience to back it up.

I’ve also heard about the coffee enema but haven’t tried it yet. Why not wheatgrass or spirulina? Just wondering why of all things a coffee enema? Guess I have some research to do.

I’ve been asked a lot about the Master Cleanse. I have friends who swear by it and certainly loose weight and toxins with the plan, but I personally haven’t been able to stick to it for more than a couple of days. Some people are more focused than me and can totally handle it. I prefer to cleanse a little daily as well with lots of lemon juice and I add cayenne to my water during winter months.

Here’s a handy tip for you. Last winter I had a nagging cough in the middle of the night and I was able to relieve it only with some liquid cayenne in warm water. I gargled then swallowed the water and it went away. It also warmed me up a bit. I get my liquid cayenne from HerbFarm. It’s available at most natural food stores. I love to use it in sauces also because it can blend easier than the powder but you have to be careful with how much you use since it’s so potent.

That’s it about the cleanse so…bottoms up!

~RawMa

 

Edible and Non- Edible Flowers

I’ve been wondering about which flowers I could add to my raw feasts. They look beautiful and taste delicious too. I was thrilled when I opened an e-mail this morning and a new raw friend had sent out a wonderful list of edible flowers.

Joz wrote:
Organic edible flowers are not just for salads and garnish. I love using them in smoothies, too! Did you know that organic edible flowers are rich in nectar and pollen (studies have shown pollen to be nutritious with minerals and vitamins). Roses, especially rose hips, are very high in vitamin C. Dandelion blossoms (and yellow flowers, in general) have plenty of vitamin A, while the leaves are loaded with iron, calcium, phosophorous and vitamins A and C. Marigolds and Nasturtium have vitamin C.

Other herb flowers-The tiny flowering blooms of the
following spices are edible: anise, basil, bee balm, chives, coriander
(cilantro), dill, fennel, garlic, oregano, rosemary, and thyme.

* Borage blossoms (Borago officinalis)-Tiny blue flowers have
slight cucumber flavor.
* Calendula flowers (Calendula officinalis)-Also known as “pot
marigolds”, multi-colored blooms with a peppery taste. Sometimes
called “poor man’s saffron”
* Carnation flowers (Dianthus caryophyllus)-Red, pink, and
white blossoms with clove taste.
* Chamomile flowers (Chamaemilum nobile)-Daisy-like flowers
with a slight hint of apple flavor. Especially good for parrots when
calming influence is needed.
* Chives (Allium schoenoprasum)-the lavander-pink pom pom
flower is actually composed of many small florets. Flowers have a mild
onion flavor.
* Daisies (Bellis perennis)-Yellow and white flowers with
light mint or clover flavor. Flowers
* Dandelion flowers – pictured (Taraxacum officinale)-Small
yellow blossoms have honey flavor when picked young. Older flowers are
bitter but my Eclectus parrots do not seem to notice. Also offer the
dandelion leaves which are an excellent source of nutrition.
* Day lilies (Hemerocallis)-Many colored blossoms with sweet
taste and crunchy lettuce texture. Flower buds and blossoms can be
consumed at all stages of growth. Note: Many lilies (Lillium species)
contain alkaloids and are NOT safe for parrots or people.
* Elderberry flowers (Sambucus canadensis)-Sweet tasting
flowers. For colds and chills, Gypsies mix elderberry flowers, yarrow
and peppermint and steep in boiling water for 13 minutes, and drink
tea frequently.
* Gladiolus (Gladiolus spp.)Flowers of many colors grow on a
spike with flowers above each other, all usually facing the same way.
Has lettuce texture and flavor.
* Hibiscus flowers (Hibiscus rosa-sinensis)-Tropical blossoms
in a variety of colors have slightly acidic taste. One of the favorite
flowers of most parrot species.
* Honeysuckle flowers (Japanese Lonicera japonica)-Small white
to yellow trumpet-shaped blossoms are sweet and delicious. Parrots
relish these flowers and the Loridae family of birds especially loves
the honeysuckle nectar. Only the Japanese honeysuckle is edible and
only the blooms should be used as the berries are extremely poisonous.
Offer only the flowers so that no berries on the vines will
accidentally be eaten.
* Impatiens (Impatiens wallerana)-Multi-color small blooms
with mild taste.
* Johnny-Jump-Up flowers–(Viola tricolor) Yellow, violet, and
lavender flowers with wintergreen flavor. Leaves are also edible and
contain vitamin C.
* Lilac (Syringa vulgaris)–Lavender blossoms have heavy
floral fragrance and lemon flavor.
* Marigolds flowers (Tagetes signata pumila)-Bright yellow and
orange flowers with citrus flavor.
* Milk thistle (Silybum marianum)-Purple flowers are edible as
well as leaves and seeds which are known for benefits to liver.
* Nasturtiums (Tropaeolum majus)–Red, yellow, and orange
flowers have a tangy, peppery flavor and are the most popular of all
edible flowers. Leaves can be eaten too.
* Pansies (Viola X Wittrockiana)-Purple, white, yellow
bi-color blooms have a sweet, tart flavor. Flowers
* Passionflowers – pictured (Passifloraceae – passion flower
family)–Passiflora caerulea and Passiflora edulis are two of the
hundreds of varieties. Some vines produce large greenish white and
purple blossoms and then orange or purple edible fruit, depending upon
the variety of the plant. *See website below with information and
photos of 200 Passionflower varieties.
* Roses (Rosa spp)-Some of the tastiest rose varieties are
Rosa xdamascena, Rosa gallica, and Rosa rugosa, Flower carpet rose,
Double Delight, Mirandy, and Tiffany variety. Roses have a slight
fruity flavor.
* Sage (Salvia officinalis)-Lavender-blue flower spikes grow
only on the culinary variety. The variegated species of sage do not
flower. Flowers have distinctive sage flavor.
* Other herb flowers-The tiny flowering blooms of the
following spices are edible: anise, basil, bee balm, chives, coriander
(cilantro), dill, fennel, garlic, oregano, rosemary, and thyme.
* Sunflowers (Helianthus)–Many varieties but most have yellow
leaves around a “black eye” center. Mature flowers contain the seed
that all parrots find so irresistible!
* Tree flowers-Parrots can be offered the flowering blooms of
the following trees: Apple, bottlebrush, citrus (orange, lemon, lime,
grapefruit, kumquat), eucalyptus, melaleuca, and plum.
* Tulips (Tulipa spp.)-Multi-color flowers with crisp, cucumber taste.
* Vegetable flowers-Butterblossom squash flowers have slight
squash taste. Zucchini flowers,
podded pea flowers (ornamental peas
are poisonous),
okra, pumpkin, and runner bean flowers are edible.
* Violets (Viola odorata)-Deep violet and white color with
sweet wintergreen taste.

Some of the NON-EDIBLE’S and possibly poisonous are:
Azalea
Azaleas are flowering shrubs from the Rhododendron family whose stems grow just one flower. Azaleas can be particularly poisonous to animals. Symptoms of poisoning after ingesting azaleas include vomiting, diarrhea, hyper-salivation, weakness, coma and hypotension.
Black Locust
Black Locust is a large, deciduous tree with pea-like white flowers. It can be toxic in large quantities if ingested and may cause depression, weakness, dilated pupils, vomiting, bloody diarrhea, weak pulse, coldness of arms and legs, paleness and shock.
Buttercup
Buttercups are yellow perennials and can be found throughout the US. They can be toxic if eaten in large amounts or cause a minor skin irritation. Symptoms of poisoning by a Buttercup include skin redness, burning sensation and blisters around the area that had contact with the sap.
Calla Lily
Calla lilies are often found in floral settings in homes and at weddings. While beautiful, a calla lily can be fatal if ingested. Calla lilies are tall with white bulbs. Signs of poisoning include burning and swelling lips, tongue and throat. Sometimes, stomach pain and diarrhea will also present.
Daffodil
Daffodils are yellow, innocent-looking flowers. However, if ingested in large quantities, they can be poisonous and even fatal. Signs of poisoning include nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, salivation, trembling and convulsions. Daffodils may also cause severe skin irritation.
Mistletoe
Mistletoe is an evergreen with white and pink berries. The berries can cause nausea in large amounts, but a few are generally not toxic. Eating other parts of the plant can cause problems however, such as difficulty with vision and convulsions.
Morning Glory
Morning Glories are commonly found in gardens and can be found in many colors, including white, blue and purple. Morning glories are not as poisonous as other flowers, but still shouldn’t be ingested. Their seeds can cause hallucinations, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, drowsiness, numbness and muscle tightness.
Poinsettia
Many people are familiar with the popular Christmas plant, the Poinsettia. Its red petals are hard to confuse with any other plant. Poinsettias are mildly poisonous to humans but can be deadly to animals. Symptoms of poisoning include stomach pain with vomiting and diarrhea.
Wisteria
Wisteria is a beautiful climbing plant with white, blue or purple flowers. If a large amount is ingested it may cause nausea, vomiting, stomach pain and diarrhea. the poisonous species can cause health problems for animals, including dogs, cats and horses, as well as human beings.

**THIS IS NOT A COMPLETE LIST, SO PLEASE USE CAUTION AND DO YOUR RESEARCH BEFORE EATING ANY PLANTS YOU ARE NOT 100% SURE WILL BE SAFE FOR YOU**

Peace,
RawMa

 

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